Where Photography Belongs

A part of Copenhagen Photo Festival

Thursday 8 June 2017 at 10:00 Blixen-salen
The photographer Christian Vium opens his exhibition 'Revelations' at the festival and partakes in the conference
The photographer Christian Vium opens his exhibition 'Revelations' at the festival and partakes in the conference
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Where Photography Belongs

Since its launch in 2010, Copenhagen Photo Festival has grown to become Scandinavia’s largest photo event. Join us for a conference arranged by Copenhagen Photo Festival and Ph.D. Art historian Charlotte Præstegaard Schwartz in collaboration with The National Museum of Photography, the Royal Danish Library.

The conference aims to investigate various intersections of the photographic medium and human communities. It poses questions to photography as a meaning-maker in the creation of communities; to how communities are being represented and reshaped by artistic practices; how experiences of belonging and solidarity have been formed by photography historically and in our contemporary life. With examples of empirical analysis, research based art practices and theoretical insight the seminar will point to where photography belongs today in an increasingly community-based society.

Since it’s beginning photography has been an instrument for social control and consumption, as it can be experienced in family and passport photographs with a considerable notion of issues about exclusions and inclusions. In the 21st century photography has gained momentum as a highly influential medium in our public and private life as it is circulating and it fact constituting both public political and social networks as seen in youth culture, uprisings, protests and fake news.

The conference makes a critical interrogation into the role of photography both as an aesthetic and political image and as a pervasive technology that effect our environments and possible futures; the way we are thinking and feeling; our relation to space and time, and also the way we gather, come together and create conflictual, imaginary, and temporary communities in political, social and private spaces.

Place: The National Museum of Photography, the Royal Danish Library


PROGRAM

10.00-10.15 Arrival and morning coffee

10.15-10.30 Welcome by Sarah Giersing, Head of The National Museum of Photography, the Royal Danish Library and Charlotte Præstegaard Schwartz, PhD, art historian and researcher, University of Southern Denmark

Section I: Artistic, Aesthetical and philosophical reflexions

10.30-11.00 Key Note Daniel Rubinstein, Editor of the journal ‘Philosophy of Photography’ and Course Leader of MA Photography at Central Saint Martins, London

11.00-11.30 Christian Vium, Danish artist and Post.doc. School of Culture and Society, Department of Anthropology, Aarhus University

11.30-11.40 Reflection and dialog with the speakers and moderator Mette Sandbye, Professor in Photography, Head of Department Art and Cultural Studies, Copenhagen University

11.40-11.50 Break

11.50-12.20 Key Note Joanna Lowry, leader of the Photography MA and the Photography, Moving Image and Sound programme, University of Brighton

12.20-12.50 Esther Shalev-Gerz, Lithuanian artist based in Paris

12.50-13.10 Reflection and dialog with the speakers and moderator Mette Sandbye

13.10-13.50 Lunch

Section II: Artistic and curatorial reflexions

13.50-14.30 Dialog in the exhibition Blind Spots. Image of the Danish West Indies colony, The National Museum of Photography with Mette Kia Krabbe Meyer, Senior Researcher, the Royal Danish Library and Danish artist Nanna Debois Buhl

14.30-15.00 Karen Irvine, Deputy Director and Chief Curator, Museum of Contemporary Photography, Chicago

15.00-15.30 Kim Knoppers, Curator, Foam Magazine

15.30-16.00 Reflection and dialog with the speakers and moderator Charlotte Præstegaard Schwartz
Time to sum up and to say thanks and goodbye.

Price: 300 DKK. We offer a partout ticket that includes the conference, lunch and ticket to the exhibition, Blind spots. Images of the Danish West Indies Colony at The National Museum of Photography.